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Sci Fi Night: The Angry Red Planet (1959)

When:
September 20, 2017 @ 6:00 pm America/Los Angeles Timezone
2017-09-20T18:00:00-07:00
2017-09-20T18:15:00-07:00

Wednesday, September 20.

Doors at 6 PM.

FREE with minimum $5 food or beverage purchase.

Beer and Fry specials all night long!

All ages.

The best in B science fictions movies, drive-in classics, psychotronic weirdness and more. A free raffle before the feature include some very cool, very strange science fiction prizes including figurines, posters, books, cards, VHS movies and more for that inner science fiction enthusiast in us all.Sponsored by Savage Henry Magazine, Scrap Humboldt, Phantom Wave Records, Daisy Drygoods, Vintage Avenger, Tin Can Mailman, The Clothing Dock, MEAT Clown Buttons, and more.

The United States space program reports that its missing, overdue manned Mars probe has returned to Earth orbit, but that they haven’t been able to make radio contact with it. When it is brought down by remote control, they find three of the four crewmembers aboard: one of them, Professor Gettell (Les Tremayne), is dead; another, mission commander Colonel Tom O’Bannion (Gerald Mohr), is in a coma and suffering from some kind of alien infection; and the third, exo-biologist Iris Ryan (Nora Hayden), is in a state of shock. The ship’s tape library seems to have been wiped clean of any record of what took place on the mission, and the doctors can’t begin to save O’Bannion until they know what happened. In desperation, they decide to put Iris Ryan into a state of hypnosis, forcing her to recall the events of the mission.

 One of a relative handful of 1950s sci-fi films done in color, The Angry Red Planet did its rivals one better with the use of a special effects process called “Cinemagic,” which gave the entire screen a deep red tint but also created the illusion of dimensionality (i.e. 3-D, sort of), and made the monsters look particularly eerie. The mixture of better-than-usual special effects, coupled with more than competent acting (Mohr, Tremayne, and Kruschen were veterans of mainstream films and television) helps make this one of the more entertaining space-flight stories of its period. Rottentomatoes.

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